Tag Archives: writing update

November 2019 Update

In the month of Blade Runner (look it up), I’ve spent every day adding new content to my NaNoWriMo 2019 project, Washed Up: A Pirate Adventure. That was my entire month. Every day. Writing. Lots of writing. Lots and lots of writing, especially on the 22nd.

In a moment, I’ll share with you the results of that marathon, but first let me tell you that I predicted in October that I would be posting my November update late. Was that prediction by design? Not really, but I do find it fitting that I’m combining a monthly update with a Friday update. Also, it would be difficult to post a November update that is focused almost entirely on NaNoWriMo without recording the last day’s progress. So, waiting until now makes more sense. Plus, it’s Friday.

Also before I show you how NaNoWriMo went, I wanted to say that I did spend one evening working on Snow in Miami, bringing me close to the end of the first draft. I’m almost there. Though, it should be noted by now that I won’t have it publishable until next year. Sorry! But I want to get this one right.

Speaking of getting it right, I think I’ve figured out a new plan for my series of Christmas fables, originally conceptualized as The 12 Fables of Christmas (plus three more). Snow in Miami (the second in the series) features a storyteller character named Douglas McCray, who is essentially the lower class stepfather version of Grandpa from The Princess Bride, who gets his lazy points of view across to his family through a series of self-serving parables, but who must then endure one parable from a family member (or other) as a counterargument to his argument and ultimately a source of change for him and his way of thinking. I’m considering repurposing The Fountain of Truth as the first part of the “McCray Parables.” The idea came to me while I was driving home from Barnes & Noble a few minutes ago, but I think it’s a great idea. I’d have to make a new cover for it (and add a new story to give the current three a reason for existing), but I’m up to the challenge. I even have an idea: Douglas McCray may be justifying a decision he makes at his job during the holidays through his use of allegory. It could work. The downside is that now I’ll have to add him to all five of my planned holiday fable books.

Yes, I said five. More on that in the future.

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) 2019

So, like I said at the top, I participated in NaNoWriMo 2019 by starting on Washed Up: A Pirate Adventure, the first book in my new pirate trilogy tentatively called WTF Pirate Adventure. Because I’ve raced through it with minimal research, I can safely say that it’s a mess. But it has potential, and that potential will hopefully spawn a successful series of at least three books. I used my new NaNoWriMo Scrivener template to write it, and now I need to transfer everything I wrote to a new document where I can finish it. I’ll do that today.

Regarding the story itself, I made it to just shy of the midpoint when the NaNoWriMo event ended, but I’ll definitely need to do a lot of editing for any of this to work well. It’s got some bloat at the moment. Bloat and a boat.

But it also has some entertaining moments. And that’s what we want when all is said and done. Right?

So, with that all said, here are the results of my NaNoWriMo participation, taken directly from my Scrivener “Tracking Elements” section. As you can see, I wrote quite a bit this month.

Day 1:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,414 words
  • -Total Word Count: 2,414 words

Day 2:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Total Word Count:  4,414 words

Day 3:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,121 words
  • -Total Word Count: 5,535 words

Day 4:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,701 words
  • -Total Word Count: 7,236 words

Day 5:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,529 words
  • -Total Word Count: 8,765 words

Day 6:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,060 words
  • -Total Word Count: 10,825 words

Day 7:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,050 words
  • -Total Word Count: 11,875 words

Day 8:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 830 words
  • -Total Word Count: 12,705 words

Day 9:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,801 words
  • -Total Word Count: 14,506 words

Day 10:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,611 words
  • -Total Word Count: 17,117 words

Day 11:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,822 words
  • -Total Word Count: 18,939 words

Day 12:

  • -Target Word Count: 200 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 201 words
  • -Total Word Count: 19,140 words

Day 13:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 604 words
  • -Total Word Count: 19,744 words

Day 14:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,036 words
  • -Total Word Count: 20,780 words

Day 15:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,264 words
  • -Total Word Count: 23,044 words

Day 16:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,746 words
  • -Total Word Count: 25,790 words

Day 17:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 539 words
  • -Total Word Count: 26,329 words

Day 18:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,884 words
  • -Total Word Count: 29,213 words

Day 19:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,830 words
  • -Total Word Count: 31,043 words

Day 20:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 735 words
  • -Total Word Count: 31,778 words

Day 21:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,758 words
  • -Total Word Count: 34,536 words

Day 22:

  • -Target Word Count: 3,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 7,625 words
  • -Total Word Count: 42,161 words

Day 23:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,397 words
  • -Total Word Count: 43,558 words

Day 24:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,111 words
  • -Total Word Count: 44,669 words

Day 25:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,327 words
  • -Total Word Count: 45,996 words

Day 26:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 3,302 words
  • -Total Word Count: 49,298 words

Day 27:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,524 words
  • -Total Word Count: 50,882 words

Day 28:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,277 words
  • -Total Word Count: 52,099 words

Day 29:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,178 words
  • -Total Word Count: 53,277 words

Day 30:

  • -Target Word Count: 3,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 4,238 words
  • -Total Word Count: 57,515 words

If you want to glimpse the story and the first eight days of my NaNoWriMo experience, please be sure to check out my YouTube channel for the NaNoWriMo 2019 playlist.

What I’m Reading

November hasn’t been just about NaNoWriMo. I’ve also started reading the classic Treasure Island to remind myself what pirate literature looks like (and because I’ve never read it, and I really need to read more classic literature). I have an old paperback version that was printed in the 1960s (part of my grandfather’s collection), but my go-to site for researching pirates, The Pirate King, has a faithful reproduction of the story, complete with parchment background. It’s pretty nice. (It also has better copyediting than the version I’m reading.)

I also finished reading Lee Child’s One Shot (Jack Reacher #9), which is the book that the first Tom Cruise movie adapts, and Christopher Moore’s Noir, who I’ve never read before but wanted to for some time (of his books that aren’t about the supernatural), and found both books quite entertaining. If you’re looking for a great book this holiday season, you can’t go wrong with Jack Reacher or Noir. Though, you also can’t go wrong with my favorite from 2018, Stuart Turton’s The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle. I loved that debut as much as I did Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One (2011). See all of the name-dropping I’m doing?

Finally, I’ve picked two new books on the writing craft: Fight Write and Compass of Character (the latter of which I’ve just bought today). I don’t spend much time discussing the books on craft that I’ve read, but it’s often been my intention to start one of these days. At some point, I’d like to write a series on the best writing books I’ve read. Let me know if you’re interested.

So, that’s November (and the first week of December). Hope yours went well. Stay tuned for the next update, coming in a few weeks.

Cover Image: Pixabay

October 2019 Update

It’s October, and you know what that means!

No, not Halloween. I mean, yeah, sure, it does mean that, but no, I’m not talking about that. And, no, not pumpkin spice lattes, either, even though those are awesome, and I don’t know why I’m not drinking one right now. But not that, either.

No, not scary movies. Not Oscar-bait films.

Why all of these off-topic guesses? Don’t you know me by now? You know what October really means! Right?

You do know what that means.

Right?!

Time for an update?

Familiar at all?

*blank stares*

Okay, yeah, I guess that was not at all obvious since I rarely post updates except for the exceedingly rare Friday update that I do every twentieth Friday or so in an even-numbered year, and my last monthly update was not in September or August. It may not have even been in 2019. I’d have to go back and check.

I really need to stay on top of this blog more often.

Okay, well, that all said and off-topic, I think it’s time to give you an update about all of the writing-related stuff you either missed or I didn’t share this past month (or year). Given that it’s not yet the end of the month, calling it the “October 2019 Update” is probably weird. If I do a “November 2019 Update,” then I’ll fill in the details that we missed in the weeks between now and November. I may post that update sometime in mid-December. We’ll see.

The point here is that it’s update time, regardless of what we call it, and if you’re a reader of this blog, then hopefully that means you’re interested in what I’ve been doing. And let me tell you, what I’ve been doing is playing lots of videogames.

Kidding. Most of my games are passive and don’t require me to interact with them that much.

Outside of that, I’ve been dealing with pain in my right arm for a number of weeks now. I haven’t gone to the doctor about it yet because I don’t want to deal with pain medication or any other quick fix that could potentially create new complications, nor do I want to deal with the issue that I’m supposed to see the doctor about but have been putting off because I’m tired of getting stuck with needles. But this is not a unique problem. Since about 2014, I’ve been dealing with occasional bouts of long-term muscle strain in both arms (not at the same time), usually brought on by thinking I can do more than 20 push-ups a day or more than one pull-up. This new pain is especially difficult because it’s primarily in my thumb joint, which can affect my typing, but it does seem to hurt less than it did a couple of months ago, so I may be doing better. Either that, or I’ve just gotten used to it by now. Fortunately, I have support gear to help me minimize further strain. So, as long as I remember to wear it, I’m fine. At the moment as I type, I’m not wearing any of it.

Anyway, this isn’t a medical blog, so you don’t care about any of that. You’re here for the writing updates. Or you’re here because you meant to click on something else and your aim is a bit off. Not sure which, so let’s assume you’re here for the writing updates.

Snow in Miami

For those of you who remember that I’m still working on my second series of Christmas fables, Snow in Miami, I’m happy to say that I’m almost finished with the first draft. Yes, after three years of working on it, I’m finally near the end. I think. I’m writing the final section this week, but it’s taken a turn I hadn’t anticipated, and I may end up with a lot more story by the time I finish than I originally planned to have. Hard to say. As of now, the story has over 43,000 words. I’d expected about 25,000 for the whole thing. Not sure why anymore, as it clearly needs every word it has and more.

I’ve also come to realize that the smaller stories that make up the larger tale are in need of details that I don’t yet have, so the final product will likely top 50,000 words, well over twice the length of its Christmas fable predecessor, The Fountain of Truth. Part of what I’m dealing with here is that the three fables are not separate stories like they are in the previous collection but interwoven tales that help form an outer narrative involving a storyteller who must learn from his family how to prioritize their needs better so he can become a better husband and stepfather. This story was always intended to frame the smaller tales, similar to Peter Falk reading The Princess Bride to a 12-year-old Fred Savage, but the story’s final act has taken a life of its own, thanks to the realization that the narrator’s story means nothing if he doesn’t have his own active arc to deal with. So now I’ve effectively turned Snow in Miami into four stories, not three. And because the three smaller stories need more details to really work (to the extent that they’re stories within a story), I know I’ve got a bit more to write before I can start the revision process.

That said, here’s what I have left to do:

The McCray Parables: This is the main story, the narrative hub for Snow in Miami. As of now, I’ve got the story’s narrator, Douglas McCray, wandering around downtown in the middle of the night, searching for a toy to give to his stepson before Christmas officially begins. I think I need a bit more story in the transitional sections to really land the change that he and his family make along the way, but most of what I have left to do is to simply finish it. I’m nearly there.

Unexpected Weather: This is the first fable (and the base story where the name “Snow in Miami” comes from). It’s basically finished, but it needs some continuity checks and possible transitional sections to keep it sensible. I haven’t yet read it from beginning to end, so I’m not completely sure it even works, but I’ll get it to work, even if I have my doubts that it works right now. I can say that it’s comfortably absurd at least. It’s partly about an unexpected change in weather patterns, but it’s also about one man’s adjustment to a new city as he vapes his way to happiness and Christmas.

A Black Friday Tale: This is the second fable and pretty much exactly as I want it. The only work I have left to do here is to edit and revise it. It’s a mashup of clichés in story form, involving a bet that two people make about who can score the best flatscreen television on Black Friday, using the classic clichés in motion: “The Early Bird Gets the Worm,” “Cheaters Never Prosper,” “Crime Doesn’t Pay,” and “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait.” There’s actually a fifth part to this tale, but that’s hidden until the great reveal at the end. Anyway, I’m happy with it.

The Pear Tree: This is the third fable, and I just finished the core story a week ago (finally!). This is the story that’s held up production for the last two years. I’ve always known what I wanted out of the first two fables, but I’ve had a much harder time thinking about the point of this story, especially since it’s not Douglas’s story, but his wife’s, so the heart of the fable had to come from a different place than the previous two. The story itself, I more or less knew what I wanted out of it since the beginning, but the theme has been elusive until fairly recently. I think I’ve got the angle now, so I’ll be spending the revision process making sure the details fit that angle. That said, I have more to do in the first draft, as the early sections of the story are vastly underwritten compared to the late section, and it’s clearly become more character-involved than I had originally intended.

So, what does this all mean? Will it be ready for Christmas?

Probably not. Even though I expect to have the first draft finished very soon, I don’t expect to have it ready for readers until sometime next year. The good news is that once the first draft is finished, I’ll be able to see the whole thing for what it really is, and then I can make sound decisions on how to shape it and make it better. But I won’t be racing through the process like I did for The Fountain of Truth. I want to make sure that every product I release from this point forward is actually ready for readers. Snow in Miami won’t be ready for readers until I get readers to tell me it’s ready. I can’t expect to finish, edit, revise, find cover art, and get several beta readers together before December, not if I want a strong first impression. So, this update is basically to let readers of this blog know that the story is nearly finished, but I probably won’t release it until sometime after September 2020. It doesn’t mean that it absolutely won’t make a 2019 debut, but the likelihood is so low at the moment that it’s probably not worth holding your breath for it. I do think 2020 will be the year it finally makes its debut. Four years after its target release ain’t bad!

Sigh.

What I may do if I can’t get the book done and ready by December is post the first section here for you all to read sometime in the days leading to Christmas. I think that’s reasonable.

NaNoWriMo 2019:

NaNoWriMo is coming up in a couple of weeks, and though I’ve told myself to skip 2019 and focus on completing my second editions for current e-books, I do have a story in my head that needs to get out, and I would like to start it in November, if for no other reason but to get something on paper. But, I’ll talk more about that soon. Until I actually work on it, it’s probably not the right time to discuss it. The most I’ll say is that it may or may not be a pirate adventure in the same universe as A Modern-day Fantasy, and it’s possibly the first in a trilogy. Okay, that’s all you get.

Unless I record my progress for YouTube, in which case you may get to watch me write the thing …

No promises, though. Not unless you ask for one.

Second Editions:

Speaking of second editions, let’s talk about those for a spell, as I’m still putting a few of them together.

First of all, I’m still exploring a new angle for Cards in the Cloak that will leave me more satisfied with the final product than what I currently have. I’ve got one new chapter already written, and I know what I want to do with the rest. I just have to sit down and write it. Once it’s finished, I’ll likely discontinue the current version (on Amazon and the major retailers; Smashwords will continue to host all editions for anyone who really wants it), and make the next update the official story.

Gone from the Happy Place is still in a holding pattern. Because The Computer Nerd is fine as it is, I haven’t been in a hurry to “fix” it. The improved version will come eventually, but probably not before I invest in my own ISBNs. I would like to push out the newer story sooner than later, however. Not much has moved on it since 2018, unfortunately.

Shell Out has a new opening chapter, but I don’t think I’ll attach it to the current story that you can find online. I’m pretty sure it will be part of a from-scratch retelling of the current story, told as a novella, or even a novel, with new stakes, premise, and everything. It will likely endure the same treatment that Amusement and The Celebration of Johnny’s Yellow Rubber Ducky are going through, with the same story receiving a much greater expansion into a much greater world. I’m still trying to figure out how to prioritize certain stories for the backlist so that they’ll be better prepared for my front list series releases.

The Fallen Footwear is probably the next story to receive an emergency update. Because the current e-book is a major update to the original short story that I wrote in college, and because I wrote that update during my ultra-prolific release period of May 2015 to May 2016, which meant I released it before really taking the time to decide if it was actually ready for release, including skipping the time I needed to set it aside and read it later to see if I even liked it, I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s my worst public story, and I need to redo it (though I still really like Chapter 1—it’s that dang rest of the story I can’t stand at the moment). So, that’ll happen soon. I’ve actually begun the update already, but I hated so much of what I’ve read that I had to stop and take a break from it. That was about two months ago. It’s another reason why I won’t be doing any more release blitzes in the future. I can give better first impressions.

The Audiovisual Book Experience:

In other news, last month I recorded myself reading Amusement off of Scrivener and uploaded the video series to YouTube. As of now, each episode has views in the low single digits. Basically, it wasn’t a successful experiment, so I probably won’t do another for a while, but I might if more people discover it. If you’re reading this blog, you can jumpstart the Audiovisual Book Experience series by checking out the videos. The playlist for Amusement contains nine videos, including one overview and one introduction that includes legal information (which I read in a funny voice because legal information is lame otherwise).

If you want to see more of these, please leave me comments and feedback, and maybe vote for the story you’d like to see me read in public next.

Writing a Scene in yWriter6:

As of this writing, my YouTube video “Writing a Scene in yWriter6 (yWriter vs Scrivener Part 7)” has 164 views, the third highest in the series, in spite of it being over an hour long. Its total retention rate is at 6.3%, which is pretty amazing given the type of video it is. One commenter liked it so much that he wanted to see more. I don’t know if he’s ever come back to my channel to see if I actually did make more “Writing a Scene in yWriter6” videos, but he did get me thinking that it’s a good series worth continuing, so I’m probably going to make more of them in the near future. So, if you like the video and want to see more of that series, let me know in the comments either here or on the video’s page. It would also be useful to let me know if you want to see the outlining process included or just the scene writing.

Either way, the scene series will continue with Pop Goes the Waterbed.

Conclusion:

So, that’s what’s going on in writer’s world at the moment. Keep checking this blog for new updates about the stories you care about and the life events that you don’t. Leave a comment if you have anything that you want to ask that I can answer and won’t feel shame about later. As always, click the blue button at the bottom of the page to subscribe to this blog.

And while we’re at it, let me know if you’d like these updates split up into multiple releases. Looking at the word count, I can see I’ve given you a lot of information today. Raise your hand if you’ve read this far.

Cover Image: Pixabay