Tag Archives: affinity photo

New Book Cover Designs Coming Soon

Anyone who scrolls through the archives here will likely see a common theme: I like to update my preexisting books to the point of nausea, perhaps more than I like starting new ones. I’m sure this is frustrating for any reader who’s already read all of my books half a dozen times and just wants to see something fresh for a change (though my sales reports suggest those readers don’t yet exist), but one important element of becoming an author worth reading is to have a backlog of titles worth reading, and I want to make sure that my books are right for their target audiences, covering each detail from story, to content, to metadata, and so on.

This often means going back to the beginning and fixing each title’s cover design.

Now, I don’t have a lot of experience with cover design. Previewing the media galleries for each of my book pages (which you can check out via the side menu to your right) will show you that my early designs are actually pretty awful. But you’ll also see that I’ve done a lot of studying and a lot of practice, and the result has led me to creating some covers that I’m quite happy with. Most recently, you can see my coming of age stories, Gutter Child and When Cellphones Make Us Crazy, have evolved from this:

To this:

While it’s possible that I can still do better, I think these show that I’m finding my way to betterment pretty well.

Part of this gradual design evolution is thanks to me upgrading my graphics software. For years I was running off of PaintShop Pro only. While I think it’s sufficient for performing a simple graphics design task, I also think it’s limited. As I’ve gradually increased my graphics access to PaintShop Pro 2020, Painter 2019, Luminar 3, and GRFX Studio (included with my PaintShop Pro Deluxe purchase), however–all part of a photo design back I got at Humble Bundle last year–I’ve been able to accomplish more tricks and techniques to give my cover designs more pop, as you can see if you look at my gallery of covers for Lightstorm. But they still lacked some of the core elements I’ve most wanted to fix, including my title typography.

Enter Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer.

Thanks to Serif developing a suite of Adobe-wreckers that rival PhotoShop, Illustrator, and InDesign, called Photo, Designer, and Publisher respectively, all for a low one-time fee, I’ve been able to finally design book covers worthy of the stories they keep. I’ve already updated several of these covers to titles I no longer plan to update (again, check the side panel). But there are still a few more that I’m rewriting that will debut with new covers sometime this year or next.

In case you haven’t seen these updates on Facebook already, here are those updated covers (to the right of their older covers for comparison):

If you click on the images to the right corresponding to these titles, you can get more information. In most cases, these updated stories will drastically differ from their current versions.

What still remains? Basically The Fountain of Truth.

So, I hope you’ve enjoyed this preview, and that you’ll keep an eye on this blog for when these stories are finally updated.

Also, you should check out Serif’s Affinity products if you haven’t already. They’re the best software purchases I’ve made in the last year, and they’re gaining popularity–probably because they’re awesome products built by an awesome software company that appears to value its customers.

Cover Image: Pixabay

Now I Can Make Proper Industry-Standard Paperbacks (without using Adobe InDesign)

Just found another useful resource last night that I’m super impressed with. Maybe you’ve heard of it, maybe not.

All of us know about Adobe PhotoShop, Illustrator, and InDesign. We also know that we have to spend $52.99 a month to use all three programs, which is useful only if we plan to use more than three Creative Cloud apps every month. Fortunately, we get a ton of apps for that price. Unfortunately, most of those apps are just add-ons to the big three (or four, if you include Premier). Seems hardly worth it to pay over $600 a year to rent a bunch of apps we’d hardly use.

For years, I’ve been troubled by this price point because I really wanted PhotoShop for game and cover design, Illustrator for additional vector design, and InDesign for accurate layouts for my books. In fact, I’ve often thought I needed InDesign to make my paperbacks industry standard.

Turns out, I don’t need any of them.

When I searched for “indesign alternatives” on YouTube last night, I kept seeing videos for something called “Affinity Publisher.” I’m usually skeptical of any software that claims to compete with the titans of industry, and it didn’t help that the thumbnails for these videos were amateur-looking. But I checked out what they said about it, anyway.

The first video got me curious, so I checked out the more “official” videos. Finally, I watched a 30-minute video from someone who creates books.

And each video got me wanting this thing more and more.

So I bought it last night.

affinity publisher 1

Turns out, Affinity Publisher is so much like InDesign that I don’t even know if there’s a noticeable omission. From my understanding, the user-interface is actually easier than InDesign (and the free alternative, Scribus). But here’s the cool thing: It integrates with Affinity’s other two flagship programs, Photo (the worthy PhotoShop alternative) and Designer (the worthy Illustrator alternative), by allowing you to press a button, in Publisher, and switch immediately to the profile for the other program, allowing you to access all of its tools. That means you can edit images and other elements right from the page you’re designing for your book, magazine, whatever.

It’s probably no surprise that I also bought Photo and Designer, just to maintain the entire suite.

So how close to $600 a year did I come to buy these programs?

Well, they retail for $50 each. One-time purchase. Free updates forever (I believe).

And I got them during one of their 50% off sales. So I spent $25 for each one. I never have to buy Adobe Anything now, but I can still do just about anything the Adobe products would let me do.

That said, if you’re looking for an alternative to Adobe Creative Cloud that you can own for a one-time payment at a fourth of the cost (or eighth if you get it during the same sale that I bought my copies in), I’d give Affinity a look. I’m impressed with it so far.

Seriously, these are good programs and worth the look.

Cover Image: Pixabay