Category Archives: The Writer’s Bookshelf

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 7: Discussing “Hooked” by Les Edgerton)

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Imagine this: You’re meeting the love of your life for the very first time today, but you don’t yet realize s(he) is the love of your life. At best, you’re hopeful that something good will come of this first date, so you prepare for the best case scenario. You put on your best clothes. You dress yourself in whatever accessories, confections, or other aids will help you make your best first impression. You prepare yourself to the best of your ability. You want this person to like you, so you want to make sure you don’t waste the opportunity to keep her/him coming back for a second round.

The art of the first impression is not just good for dating, but it’s also good for storytelling.

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This episode will cover Les Edgerton’s educational opus on how to properly open your novel, Hooked: Write Fiction That Grabs Readers at Page One & Never Lets Them Go.

This book will talk everything openings, and this video will talk some things Hooked.

Hooked: Write Fiction That Grabs Readers at Page One & Never Lets Them Go

Les Edgerton

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 256 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1582974578

·  ISBN-13: 978-1582974576

·  Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books; 5/30/07 Edition (April 12, 2007)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 6: Discussing “Story Trumps Structure” by Steven James)

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There’s an age-old question in the writing community: Are you a plotter or a pantser? When a random stranger approaches you at Walmart, carrying a garden rake and a bag of dog food, and he or she asks you this question, what do you say?

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This episode will cover Steven James’s excellent guide on how to pants your way to victory, Story Trumps Structure: How to Write Unforgettable Fiction by Breaking the Rules.

If you love writing but hate plotting, then check out this book, and check out this video based on this book.

Story Trumps Structure: How to Write Unforgettable Fiction by Breaking the Rules

Steven James

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 304 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1599636514

·  ISBN-13: 978-1599636511

·  Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books (May 27, 2014)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 5: Discussing “Story Fix” by Larry Brooks)

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Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This episode will cover Larry Brooks’s final installment in his Story Fix Trilogy, Story Fix: Transform Your Novel from Broken to Brilliant.

You’ve written a novel. It kinda sucks. You wish you knew what went wrong. This book will help you figure that out (and give you some tips on how to fix it).

And this video will tell you more about it.

Story Fix: Transform Your Novel from Broken to Brilliant

Larry Brooks

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 232 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1599639114

·  ISBN-13: 978-1599639116

·  Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books (October 19, 2015)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 4: Discussing “Story Physics” by Larry Brooks)

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Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This episode will cover Larry Brooks’s second installment in his Story Fix Trilogy, Story Physics: Harnessing the Underlying Forces of Storytelling.

Have you written a novel that seems . . . underwhelming? Maybe you need to check for its pulse. This book will teach you how to do that and revive it.

And this video will discuss whether it’s right for you.

Story Physics: Harnessing the Underlying Forces of Storytelling

Larry Brooks

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 256 pages

·  ISBN-10: 9781599636894

·  ISBN-13: 978-1599636894

·  Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books (June 18, 2013)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 3: Discussing “Story Engineering” by Larry Brooks)

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When was the last time you sat down to write a novel and thought, Er, how do I do this again? Or, I guess the better question is, when was the last time you sat down to write a novel? But assuming that answer is something other than “never,” you may have discovered that writing a novel is hard, especially if you don’t know what you’re doing.

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. Today’s writing resource book, Story Engineering by Larry Brooks, will tell you what you should be doing.

Specifically, it breaks down the structure of story, using the “six core competencies of successful writing.” In other words, it teaches you how to write a cohesive novel that publishers would buy and readers would read, assuming you understand and follow its guidelines.

It also emphasizes the differences between “plotting” and “pantsing.” If you’ve heard these terms and have no idea what they mean, then read the book, and watch the video I recorded about reading the book.

Story Engineering

Larry Brooks

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 288 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1582979987

·  ISBN-13: 978-1582979984 ·  Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books; 1st Edition (February 24, 2011)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 2: Discussing “Bird by Bird” by Anne Lamott)

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Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. Today we will be focusing on Anne Lamont’s ode to the writing life, in her masterpiece Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life. If you have not read this book, be aware that you’re ignoring a classic of the genre. This book is almost as essential to the writer’s bookshelf as last week’s Stephen King’s On Writing, even though you may ask yourself why that’s true after you’ve finished reading it. Look, don’t question the classics! They’re important because important people say they are. I don’t know whom these important people are. They just are, okay? Things were different in the early ‘90s when it was originally released. Don’t second-guess it! Just watch the video here. Then check out your copy below. It’s a classic. You know that, right?

Cynicism toward yesteryear’s classics aside, it actually is a good book that you should read if you want to prepare yourself not only for the writing life but for the structured life.

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

Anne Lamott

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 256 pages

·  ISBN-10: 0385480016

·  ISBN-13: 978-0385480017

·  Publisher: Anchor; 1st Edition (September 1, 1995)

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Introduction and Episode 1: Discussing “On Writing” by Stephen King)

Years ago when I started this blog and took my YouTube channel more seriously, I dreamed of presenting a limited book review series about the books writers might want to invest in, to further their craft, including, and especially, the books that I’ve read and learned from that still sit on my bookshelf. However, I’ve put this idea off to the side because I wasn’t sure if I should write book reviews for each title or simply create a Goodreads style list for my top favorites. In either case, I couldn’t see much benefit in doing these things for myself, or the budding writer, because if I reviewed every book, then I wouldn’t be spending that precious time writing my own book, and isn’t putting their lessons into practice the point of reading these books? On the other hand, simply populating a list of top recommended books doesn’t do much justice into why I recommend them.

At some point, I’d settled on a median where I could talk about them in an informal style, but instead of writing about them, I could speak into a camera about them. Of course, when I had that idea, I had no way of recording my face, just my voice, because I had no good camera, just an old digital Fuji from 2004 that ran on four AA batteries. If people wanted to hear just my voice, then I’d be better off with a podcast, and that would require having a better microphone. No idea was a good idea.

But, of course, the no good idea became something of a half-hopeful idea.

In 2019, I was forced to replace my old flip phone with an Android, and by doing so, I was now able to get my hands on a digital recording device that I could actually upload to YouTube. It was pretty nice. But there was still a problem present: I still had to hold the camera when I spoke into it. Hardly useful if I want to show viewers my book collection while I talk about it. Closer than I’d been, but still not what I needed to do it well.

Fast-forward to the present work-at-home world we live in, and I’ve been forced to buy a webcam and a nice backdrop, too. And a better microphone. With those things in place, I can now stand far enough from an anchored camera to speak and display books while I talk, which means I’ve run out of excuses for delaying this series, which, as I’ve mentioned, I’ve dreamed about doing for years.

That series?

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources.

This series will contain 16 episodes a season, with each season focusing on a particular theme, and season one focusing on the writing life and story structure. The plan is to debut a new title every Friday at 10am EST on my YouTube channel until the end of the year, and then start up a new season sometime in the spring.

The way it’ll work is that I’ll tell viewers about “this week’s book,” why they should want it, and what to expect from it, or how it can help them if they read it. I’ll do so through loose, one-sided conversations with them. What I won’t do is talk about every detail or get into every point the book makes. The emphasis is that the book is one you should read if you care about improving your writing career, but if you want to get the most out of it, you’ll have to actually read it. I’ll also encourage viewers to post links to their blogs or Wattpad profiles if they want to share something they’ve written based on something they’ve learned. I’ll also post new articles simultaneously on this blog to announce which book we’ll be covering that day and embed a link to the video so anyone can check it out.

You can watch the seven-minute introduction to the series here.

And when you’re done with that, you can check out our first book of the series:

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Stephen King

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 320 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1982159375

·  ISBN-13: 978-1982159375

·  Publisher: Scribner; Reissue Edition (June 2, 2020)

Yep, did you really think we’d start with anything else? Watch the video here.

Oh, and if you care about high quality videos, then you’ll have to wait until I can afford a better camera and a better studio setup for that. One way you can help expedite that process is to encourage at least 10,000 of your friends to buy copies of my e-books (the ones that actually cost something), which you can check out via the side panel. You do have 10,000 friends, right?