Category Archives: Story Updates

Book Trailer: The Computer Nerd

A couple of months ago, I revised my novel The Computer Nerd with new content and an updated paperback edition.

Well, this week, I finally did something else I’ve wanted to do for a long time: I put together a trailer for it.

I might be biased, but I think it’s a good one.

If you haven’t checked out The Computer Nerd yet, you can visit one of its official pages right here to see what it’s all about.

Note: I haven’t updated the book’s information on this site since the revision because I’m moving all of my official book pages to my author site later this summer. But you can still learn plenty from the content that still remains here.

In the meantime, why don’t you check out the trailer?

Thanks for watching,

The Free Period is Coming to an End

Just wanted to make a quick e-book announcement to my readers while I’m thinking about it.

With the construction of my new website underway, I’ll be relaunching my author career soon, and with the relaunch will come a change to my e-book pricing and availability.

In short, many of my existing titles will be going into the archives, and those that remain will be getting price tags attached.

What does that mean exactly? It means that starting in 2021 (maybe on January 1st, maybe a few weeks in–I haven’t decided yet), I’ll be removing many of my books from every retailer but Smashwords, and those that remain will no longer be free.*

This means that if you wanted to get one of my older books from someplace other than Smashwords, now is the time. Likewise, if you want any of my books for free, now is the time to get them. I can no longer sustain my author career on freebies, and I can no longer support myself by attracting readers who will only read for free. Beginning in 2021, if you want to read my books, you’ll have to pay for them.

With exceptions.

*Okay, so here are the exceptions:

Shell Out, Eleven Miles from Home (original and remastered), Amusement, and Waterfall Junction and The Narrow Bridge will still be available on every platform, while also being free to read here and on my author site. Eleven Miles from Home (and maybe Amusement) will remain free at the retailers, while the others will be priced at $0.99 to give readers the ability to “tip” me for a good read. But you’ll still be able to read them for free on both of my websites (but only there).

Gutter Child and Lightstorm will remain at all of the retailers for $2.99 and $0.99 respectively, but for how long will depend on what I do with my planned expansions for them. Once I expand them, I’ll make a new plan. Gutter Child will likely remain available even after it’s expanded (under a new title) just because it’s getting five-star reviews and I’d hate to lose them (and because the expansion will change its genre). We’ll see what happens in time.

When Cellphones Make Us Crazy is still under review. For now, it’ll remain at all the sites for its existing price, but I may remove it and rerelease it with new content later in the year. I’m pretty sure I want to expand it more.

The Fountain of Truth will remain at all of the existing sites for $0.99 until I finalize the McCray Parables expansion, in which case I’ll repackage and rerelease it for $2.99 between September and Christmas 2021. In other words, one day it’ll be available, and the next day it won’t. I can’t say for sure when this will happen. But the Smashwords edition will remain available even when it comes off the other storefronts.

Cannonball City and Superheroes Anonymous will likely stay online until I finish rebranding them. Again, I don’t know when I’ll finish this process, but you can probably continue to buy them everywhere but Amazon for at least another year. Then they’ll be archived.

The Computer Nerd will stay online at all the existing retailers, but it will be given a subtitle, 2015 Edition, to classify its difference from the Rebooted Edition coming soon. Its paperback edition will also remain for now. I may eventually archive it if it proves too confusing for buyers when the updated edition is released, but I’d rather test this than simply assume this behavior.

Zippywings 2015: A Short Story Collection will remain online for now, only because it has a paperback edition, but it will be recognized as an archived book, no longer to receive updates.

When Cellphones Go Crazy, The Celebration of Johnny’s Yellow Rubber Ducky, Cards in the Cloak, and The Fallen Footwear will all be archived in early 2021. This means they’ll be deleted from every storefront but Smashwords, and they’ll cost $0.99 to read there. But I’ll likely keep them free on my author site (well, the short stories, not Cards in the Cloak).

Also remember that The Celebration of Johnny’s Yellow Rubber Ducky is getting turned into a novel, so it’ll be back soon. Likewise, Cards in the Cloak is getting an expansion and new title, Norman Jensen Cheats Death, so it’ll also be back soon.

The Fallen Footwear will be rewritten as a novel eventually, but I don’t know when. It’ll be archived for now regardless.

When Cellphones Go Crazy is going to the archives and staying there. It’s already been expanded and repackaged as When Cellphones Make Us Crazy, so there’s no reason to keep it out in the open.

I believe that covers everything for now. Hopefully you got whichever books you want, or will before the New Year.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Oh, and here’s the cover for my NaNoWriMo 2020 story, if you’re interested:

Cover Image: Pixabay

Publishing with Google Play Books

This week, I’ve uploaded a five-part series about getting your e-book onto Google Play Books. I’ve used my e-book Shell Out as an example. I cover how to prepare an EPUB, a basic but pleasant PDF, and a fancy PDF that makes eyes happy, as well as cover how to get the book onto Google and what the results will look like once it’s online.

Here is the series and episode summary, along with resource links and action checklists. Enjoy.

Series Description:

Now that Google Play Books has reopened its service to all independent publishers, it’s a good idea to publish your books there and expand your audience reach. But how do you do that? This five-part series will walk you through the basic steps to get up and running.

Google Play Books Partner Center

Part 1: Using Calibre to Prepare Your Google Play Books E-Book

(Video Link)

Episode Description:

Google Play Books requires at least one of two formats to get your e-book online and available for consumption: EPUB and PDF. It recommends you upload both. Part 1 of the “Publishing with Google Play Books Series” covers the basics for getting an EPUB ready for the service, using a free EPUB creation tool, Calibre.

Note: This episode covers the simplest method for getting an EPUB built on Calibre and ready for Google Play Books. You’ll need to learn CSS and HTML to develop a more specialized or attractive EPUB file, which this video will not cover. I’ve listed two great resources below to help you take these basics to the professional-level.

Resources:

Calibre Web Page

Calibre User Manual

The Book Designer Guest Writer, David Kudler

The eBook Design and Development Guide by Paul Salvette

Checklist:

  1. Convert source document to DOCX format.
  2. Check and fix broken bookmarks.
  3. Delete drop caps unless you know how to format them properly for EPUB.
  4. Optional: Convert Small Caps to All Caps to ensure all e-readers show compatible formatting (but don’t do this for section headings—just words that characters “see”).
  5. Download Calibre (See Resources for Web link).
  6. Create blank EPUB file.
  7. Fill in title, author name, and whatever else you think is important.
  8. Select proper JPEG image for cover.
  9. Check document conversion attributes.
  10. Check EPUB file type (2 or 3).
  11. Verify table of contents.
  12. Validate external links.
  13. Open file in e-reader to check conversion state (“Click to Path”).
  14. Upload to Google Play Books if happy with results; fix HTML, CSS, or content errors if not.

Part 2: Quick but Effective PDF Formatting for Google Play Books

(Video Link)

Episode Description:

Google Play Books requires at least one of two formats to get your e-book online and available for consumption: EPUB and PDF. It recommends you upload both. Part 2 of the “Publishing with Google Play Books Series” covers the basics of formatting a PDF for the service, using Microsoft Word.

Note: This episode covers the simplest effective method for getting a stylish PDF ready for Google Play Books. For a more complex but ultimately more rewarding result, come back for Part 4 when I talk about a program designed for better formatting.

Resources:

Drinking Café Latte at 1pm Article: “The Art of Hyphenation”

Checklist:

If Presentation Doesn’t Matter:

  1. Create or access source document in Microsoft Word.
  2. Export to PDF (from “File” tab).
  3. Upload to Google Play Books.

If Presentation Does Matter:

  1. Create or access source document in Microsoft Word.
  2. Change layout size and margins to paperback page style (5″ x 8″; 5.5″ x 8.5″; 6″ x 9″).
  3. Reposition headers, footers, and indents to half their normal distances.
  4. Insert blank page at start of book.
  5. Upload cover image to front page and resize and center to fit.
  6. Add cover image bookmark.
  7. Check all bookmarks and hyperlinks for accuracy.
  8. Check other special formatting like small caps and drop caps.
  9. Fix justification and hyphenation.
  10. Create section break between front matter and body text and anywhere that header or footer content should differ.
  11. Set page numbers in the body text section and use special rules for proper counting and display.
  12. Make sure cover and title pages don’t have page numbers showing.
  13. Export to PDF (from “File” tab).
  14. Upload to Google Play Books.

Part 3: Getting the Book onto Google Play Books

(Video Link)

Episode Description:

Once your books are properly formatted, it’s time to upload them to Google Play Books. This video will show you how to prepare your book’s page and get it onto the service.

Resources:

Reedsy Blog Article: “How to Publish on Google Play Books in 2020”

Checklist:

  1. Register a partner account with Google Play Books (consult the Reedsy Blog article in the resources section on how to do this).
  2. Go to Book Catalog section to add a new book or access a book you want to edit.
  3. Once inside the book editing page, fill in the fields on all four tabs of the Book Info section.
  4. Use the same description as you have on the other publication sites to maintain consistency. Use bold text and italics to enhance its presentation. Use paragraph breaks to indicate new paragraphs.
  5. Remember to set the release dates: publication is for today; on sale is whenever buyers have access (good for preorders). Set the on sale date far enough in the future to give ARC readers time to read.
  6. Consult PDF version for accurate page count, or divide word count by 250 and round to nearest whole number if you’re not sure.
  7. Use as many genres as the book may occupy, especially since Google doesn’t allow for manual keywords.
  8. List all essential contributors. The author is the main contributor. Coauthors and illustrators are also essential. Editors are essential for curated materials.
  9. Fill in sample size and publisher information, if applicable.
  10. Go to Content section.
  11. Upload EPUB, PDF, and JPEG files.
  12. Go to PRICING section.
  13. Set desired price point. Set worldwide options.
  14. Return to Content section. Check conversion status. Fix errors if any appear.
  15. Provide ARC and beta reader Google emails in the content reviewer section, if any.
  16. Verify all results in the Summary section.

Part 4: Using Affinity Publisher to Create a Stunning PDF for Google Play Books

(Video Link)

Episode Description:

Creating a simple PDF for Google Play Books is fine. But wouldn’t you rather give your readers something that actually looks nice? In this video, we use Affinity Publisher to create a more sophisticated PDF than the one we made in Part 2.

Note 1: Affinity products are cheaper, non-subscription based alternatives to Adobe products. Affinity Photo, Designer, and Publisher are equivalent to Adobe PhotoShop, Illustrator, and InDesign respectively.

Note 2: All Affinity products are on sale for 50% off until June 20, 2020. Get all three (Photo, Designer, and Publisher) if you want to maximize your development. There is also a 90-day trial period in place until June 20 if you aren’t sure you want to just plop the money down straightaway.

Resources:

Affinity Publisher:

Affinity Revolution:

Checklist:

  1. Visit Affinity Web page (link in resources section).
  2. Try or buy Affinity Publisher ($50 normally; $25 until June 20, 2020)
  3. Optional: Try or buy Affinity’s other apps, Photo and Designer.
  4. Check out Affinity’s tutorials on YouTube.
  5. Learn the difference between Pages and Master Pages.
  6. Learn how to use the inspector panels.
  7. Remember to use layers for complex work.
  8. Remember to link content pages through connecting arrows.
  9. Export as PDF when finished with layout.

Part 5: Reviewing the Product Page for Your New Google Play Books E-Book

(Video Link)

Episode Description:

Now that your new book is uploaded to Google Play Books and approved for sale, let’s check it out and see what the customer will see.

This episode also compares analytics between Google Play Books, Amazon KDP, Smashwords, and Draft2Digital, so you get a bonus part-within-a-part for watching this episode. Congratulations.

Resources:

Books2Read:

Checklist:

  1. Go to Book Catalog section.
  2. Click on book cover.
  3. Go to Summary section.
  4. Click on “Google Play” or “Google Books” link to visit each respective book page.
  5. Explore each page.
  6. View or Buy book to add to library.
  7. Visit “My Books” tab to check the contents of your book (if purchased).
  8. Click on ellipses to access content within book.
  9. Select date range and parameters for analytics information.
  10. Open spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets to view statistics.
  11. Upload a new book and restart the process.

Thanks for reading. Leave a comment with your e-book information if you’ve published on Google.

Update to “My Books” Page

Just a quick maintenance note:

I’ve updated the “My Books” page with a comprehensive list of not only all of my existing book tiles and brief status descriptions for each one, but also of all of my planned future books.

This is truly the one-stop shop for information on all of my present and upcoming titles. It it’s not on this page, there’s no news on it.

Remember to click the tab, not the drop-down selections, to access the page. Or, you can just click the link here.

If you have any questions, leave a comment below.

November 2019 Update

In the month of Blade Runner (look it up), I’ve spent every day adding new content to my NaNoWriMo 2019 project, Washed Up: A Pirate Adventure. That was my entire month. Every day. Writing. Lots of writing. Lots and lots of writing, especially on the 22nd.

In a moment, I’ll share with you the results of that marathon, but first let me tell you that I predicted in October that I would be posting my November update late. Was that prediction by design? Not really, but I do find it fitting that I’m combining a monthly update with a Friday update. Also, it would be difficult to post a November update that is focused almost entirely on NaNoWriMo without recording the last day’s progress. So, waiting until now makes more sense. Plus, it’s Friday.

Also before I show you how NaNoWriMo went, I wanted to say that I did spend one evening working on Snow in Miami, bringing me close to the end of the first draft. I’m almost there. Though, it should be noted by now that I won’t have it publishable until next year. Sorry! But I want to get this one right.

Speaking of getting it right, I think I’ve figured out a new plan for my series of Christmas fables, originally conceptualized as The 12 Fables of Christmas (plus three more). Snow in Miami (the second in the series) features a storyteller character named Douglas McCray, who is essentially the lower class stepfather version of Grandpa from The Princess Bride, who gets his lazy points of view across to his family through a series of self-serving parables, but who must then endure one parable from a family member (or other) as a counterargument to his argument and ultimately a source of change for him and his way of thinking. I’m considering repurposing The Fountain of Truth as the first part of the “McCray Parables.” The idea came to me while I was driving home from Barnes & Noble a few minutes ago, but I think it’s a great idea. I’d have to make a new cover for it (and add a new story to give the current three a reason for existing), but I’m up to the challenge. I even have an idea: Douglas McCray may be justifying a decision he makes at his job during the holidays through his use of allegory. It could work. The downside is that now I’ll have to add him to all five of my planned holiday fable books.

Yes, I said five. More on that in the future.

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) 2019

So, like I said at the top, I participated in NaNoWriMo 2019 by starting on Washed Up: A Pirate Adventure, the first book in my new pirate trilogy tentatively called WTF Pirate Adventure. Because I’ve raced through it with minimal research, I can safely say that it’s a mess. But it has potential, and that potential will hopefully spawn a successful series of at least three books. I used my new NaNoWriMo Scrivener template to write it, and now I need to transfer everything I wrote to a new document where I can finish it. I’ll do that today.

Regarding the story itself, I made it to just shy of the midpoint when the NaNoWriMo event ended, but I’ll definitely need to do a lot of editing for any of this to work well. It’s got some bloat at the moment. Bloat and a boat.

But it also has some entertaining moments. And that’s what we want when all is said and done. Right?

So, with that all said, here are the results of my NaNoWriMo participation, taken directly from my Scrivener “Tracking Elements” section. As you can see, I wrote quite a bit this month.

Day 1:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,414 words
  • -Total Word Count: 2,414 words

Day 2:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Total Word Count:  4,414 words

Day 3:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,121 words
  • -Total Word Count: 5,535 words

Day 4:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,701 words
  • -Total Word Count: 7,236 words

Day 5:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,529 words
  • -Total Word Count: 8,765 words

Day 6:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,060 words
  • -Total Word Count: 10,825 words

Day 7:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,050 words
  • -Total Word Count: 11,875 words

Day 8:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 830 words
  • -Total Word Count: 12,705 words

Day 9:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,801 words
  • -Total Word Count: 14,506 words

Day 10:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,611 words
  • -Total Word Count: 17,117 words

Day 11:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,822 words
  • -Total Word Count: 18,939 words

Day 12:

  • -Target Word Count: 200 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 201 words
  • -Total Word Count: 19,140 words

Day 13:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 604 words
  • -Total Word Count: 19,744 words

Day 14:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,036 words
  • -Total Word Count: 20,780 words

Day 15:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,264 words
  • -Total Word Count: 23,044 words

Day 16:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,746 words
  • -Total Word Count: 25,790 words

Day 17:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 539 words
  • -Total Word Count: 26,329 words

Day 18:

  • -Target Word Count: 2,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,884 words
  • -Total Word Count: 29,213 words

Day 19:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,830 words
  • -Total Word Count: 31,043 words

Day 20:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 735 words
  • -Total Word Count: 31,778 words

Day 21:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 2,758 words
  • -Total Word Count: 34,536 words

Day 22:

  • -Target Word Count: 3,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 7,625 words
  • -Total Word Count: 42,161 words

Day 23:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,397 words
  • -Total Word Count: 43,558 words

Day 24:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,111 words
  • -Total Word Count: 44,669 words

Day 25:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,327 words
  • -Total Word Count: 45,996 words

Day 26:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,667 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 3,302 words
  • -Total Word Count: 49,298 words

Day 27:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,524 words
  • -Total Word Count: 50,882 words

Day 28:

  • -Target Word Count: 500 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,277 words
  • -Total Word Count: 52,099 words

Day 29:

  • -Target Word Count: 1,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 1,178 words
  • -Total Word Count: 53,277 words

Day 30:

  • -Target Word Count: 3,000 words
  • -Actual Word Count: 4,238 words
  • -Total Word Count: 57,515 words

If you want to glimpse the story and the first eight days of my NaNoWriMo experience, please be sure to check out my YouTube channel for the NaNoWriMo 2019 playlist.

What I’m Reading

November hasn’t been just about NaNoWriMo. I’ve also started reading the classic Treasure Island to remind myself what pirate literature looks like (and because I’ve never read it, and I really need to read more classic literature). I have an old paperback version that was printed in the 1960s (part of my grandfather’s collection), but my go-to site for researching pirates, The Pirate King, has a faithful reproduction of the story, complete with parchment background. It’s pretty nice. (It also has better copyediting than the version I’m reading.)

I also finished reading Lee Child’s One Shot (Jack Reacher #9), which is the book that the first Tom Cruise movie adapts, and Christopher Moore’s Noir, who I’ve never read before but wanted to for some time (of his books that aren’t about the supernatural), and found both books quite entertaining. If you’re looking for a great book this holiday season, you can’t go wrong with Jack Reacher or Noir. Though, you also can’t go wrong with my favorite from 2018, Stuart Turton’s The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle. I loved that debut as much as I did Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One (2011). See all of the name-dropping I’m doing?

Finally, I’ve picked two new books on the writing craft: Fight Write and Compass of Character (the latter of which I’ve just bought today). I don’t spend much time discussing the books on craft that I’ve read, but it’s often been my intention to start one of these days. At some point, I’d like to write a series on the best writing books I’ve read. Let me know if you’re interested.

So, that’s November (and the first week of December). Hope yours went well. Stay tuned for the next update, coming in a few weeks.

Cover Image: Pixabay

The Coming of NaNoWriMo 2019

I just posted a video about NaNoWriMo 2019 and how we can prep for it with Scrivener. This comes with the idea that I may actually record my writing progress this month, for those of you who want to see a story written in real-time.

Will this likely end in disaster?

Probably! So, now you gotta watch, right?

In the video, I reveal two new templates I’ve developed this year: one for planning a story (and is still a work-in-progress), and the other a basic template for NaNoWriMo that includes options for journaling, tracking progress, and writing a postmortem when all is finished.

If you’d like to use either template for your own prep or writing adventure, you can find them both here.

If you plan to participate in NaNoWriMo, then comment below and talk about it.

Good luck!

October 2019 Update

It’s October, and you know what that means!

No, not Halloween. I mean, yeah, sure, it does mean that, but no, I’m not talking about that. And, no, not pumpkin spice lattes, either, even though those are awesome, and I don’t know why I’m not drinking one right now. But not that, either.

No, not scary movies. Not Oscar-bait films.

Why all of these off-topic guesses? Don’t you know me by now? You know what October really means! Right?

You do know what that means.

Right?!

Time for an update?

Familiar at all?

*blank stares*

Okay, yeah, I guess that was not at all obvious since I rarely post updates except for the exceedingly rare Friday update that I do every twentieth Friday or so in an even-numbered year, and my last monthly update was not in September or August. It may not have even been in 2019. I’d have to go back and check.

I really need to stay on top of this blog more often.

Okay, well, that all said and off-topic, I think it’s time to give you an update about all of the writing-related stuff you either missed or I didn’t share this past month (or year). Given that it’s not yet the end of the month, calling it the “October 2019 Update” is probably weird. If I do a “November 2019 Update,” then I’ll fill in the details that we missed in the weeks between now and November. I may post that update sometime in mid-December. We’ll see.

The point here is that it’s update time, regardless of what we call it, and if you’re a reader of this blog, then hopefully that means you’re interested in what I’ve been doing. And let me tell you, what I’ve been doing is playing lots of videogames.

Kidding. Most of my games are passive and don’t require me to interact with them that much.

Outside of that, I’ve been dealing with pain in my right arm for a number of weeks now. I haven’t gone to the doctor about it yet because I don’t want to deal with pain medication or any other quick fix that could potentially create new complications, nor do I want to deal with the issue that I’m supposed to see the doctor about but have been putting off because I’m tired of getting stuck with needles. But this is not a unique problem. Since about 2014, I’ve been dealing with occasional bouts of long-term muscle strain in both arms (not at the same time), usually brought on by thinking I can do more than 20 push-ups a day or more than one pull-up. This new pain is especially difficult because it’s primarily in my thumb joint, which can affect my typing, but it does seem to hurt less than it did a couple of months ago, so I may be doing better. Either that, or I’ve just gotten used to it by now. Fortunately, I have support gear to help me minimize further strain. So, as long as I remember to wear it, I’m fine. At the moment as I type, I’m not wearing any of it.

Anyway, this isn’t a medical blog, so you don’t care about any of that. You’re here for the writing updates. Or you’re here because you meant to click on something else and your aim is a bit off. Not sure which, so let’s assume you’re here for the writing updates.

Snow in Miami

For those of you who remember that I’m still working on my second series of Christmas fables, Snow in Miami, I’m happy to say that I’m almost finished with the first draft. Yes, after three years of working on it, I’m finally near the end. I think. I’m writing the final section this week, but it’s taken a turn I hadn’t anticipated, and I may end up with a lot more story by the time I finish than I originally planned to have. Hard to say. As of now, the story has over 43,000 words. I’d expected about 25,000 for the whole thing. Not sure why anymore, as it clearly needs every word it has and more.

I’ve also come to realize that the smaller stories that make up the larger tale are in need of details that I don’t yet have, so the final product will likely top 50,000 words, well over twice the length of its Christmas fable predecessor, The Fountain of Truth. Part of what I’m dealing with here is that the three fables are not separate stories like they are in the previous collection but interwoven tales that help form an outer narrative involving a storyteller who must learn from his family how to prioritize their needs better so he can become a better husband and stepfather. This story was always intended to frame the smaller tales, similar to Peter Falk reading The Princess Bride to a 12-year-old Fred Savage, but the story’s final act has taken a life of its own, thanks to the realization that the narrator’s story means nothing if he doesn’t have his own active arc to deal with. So now I’ve effectively turned Snow in Miami into four stories, not three. And because the three smaller stories need more details to really work (to the extent that they’re stories within a story), I know I’ve got a bit more to write before I can start the revision process.

That said, here’s what I have left to do:

The McCray Parables: This is the main story, the narrative hub for Snow in Miami. As of now, I’ve got the story’s narrator, Douglas McCray, wandering around downtown in the middle of the night, searching for a toy to give to his stepson before Christmas officially begins. I think I need a bit more story in the transitional sections to really land the change that he and his family make along the way, but most of what I have left to do is to simply finish it. I’m nearly there.

Unexpected Weather: This is the first fable (and the base story where the name “Snow in Miami” comes from). It’s basically finished, but it needs some continuity checks and possible transitional sections to keep it sensible. I haven’t yet read it from beginning to end, so I’m not completely sure it even works, but I’ll get it to work, even if I have my doubts that it works right now. I can say that it’s comfortably absurd at least. It’s partly about an unexpected change in weather patterns, but it’s also about one man’s adjustment to a new city as he vapes his way to happiness and Christmas.

A Black Friday Tale: This is the second fable and pretty much exactly as I want it. The only work I have left to do here is to edit and revise it. It’s a mashup of clichés in story form, involving a bet that two people make about who can score the best flatscreen television on Black Friday, using the classic clichés in motion: “The Early Bird Gets the Worm,” “Cheaters Never Prosper,” “Crime Doesn’t Pay,” and “Good Things Come to Those Who Wait.” There’s actually a fifth part to this tale, but that’s hidden until the great reveal at the end. Anyway, I’m happy with it.

The Pear Tree: This is the third fable, and I just finished the core story a week ago (finally!). This is the story that’s held up production for the last two years. I’ve always known what I wanted out of the first two fables, but I’ve had a much harder time thinking about the point of this story, especially since it’s not Douglas’s story, but his wife’s, so the heart of the fable had to come from a different place than the previous two. The story itself, I more or less knew what I wanted out of it since the beginning, but the theme has been elusive until fairly recently. I think I’ve got the angle now, so I’ll be spending the revision process making sure the details fit that angle. That said, I have more to do in the first draft, as the early sections of the story are vastly underwritten compared to the late section, and it’s clearly become more character-involved than I had originally intended.

So, what does this all mean? Will it be ready for Christmas?

Probably not. Even though I expect to have the first draft finished very soon, I don’t expect to have it ready for readers until sometime next year. The good news is that once the first draft is finished, I’ll be able to see the whole thing for what it really is, and then I can make sound decisions on how to shape it and make it better. But I won’t be racing through the process like I did for The Fountain of Truth. I want to make sure that every product I release from this point forward is actually ready for readers. Snow in Miami won’t be ready for readers until I get readers to tell me it’s ready. I can’t expect to finish, edit, revise, find cover art, and get several beta readers together before December, not if I want a strong first impression. So, this update is basically to let readers of this blog know that the story is nearly finished, but I probably won’t release it until sometime after September 2020. It doesn’t mean that it absolutely won’t make a 2019 debut, but the likelihood is so low at the moment that it’s probably not worth holding your breath for it. I do think 2020 will be the year it finally makes its debut. Four years after its target release ain’t bad!

Sigh.

What I may do if I can’t get the book done and ready by December is post the first section here for you all to read sometime in the days leading to Christmas. I think that’s reasonable.

NaNoWriMo 2019:

NaNoWriMo is coming up in a couple of weeks, and though I’ve told myself to skip 2019 and focus on completing my second editions for current e-books, I do have a story in my head that needs to get out, and I would like to start it in November, if for no other reason but to get something on paper. But, I’ll talk more about that soon. Until I actually work on it, it’s probably not the right time to discuss it. The most I’ll say is that it may or may not be a pirate adventure in the same universe as A Modern-day Fantasy, and it’s possibly the first in a trilogy. Okay, that’s all you get.

Unless I record my progress for YouTube, in which case you may get to watch me write the thing …

No promises, though. Not unless you ask for one.

Second Editions:

Speaking of second editions, let’s talk about those for a spell, as I’m still putting a few of them together.

First of all, I’m still exploring a new angle for Cards in the Cloak that will leave me more satisfied with the final product than what I currently have. I’ve got one new chapter already written, and I know what I want to do with the rest. I just have to sit down and write it. Once it’s finished, I’ll likely discontinue the current version (on Amazon and the major retailers; Smashwords will continue to host all editions for anyone who really wants it), and make the next update the official story.

Gone from the Happy Place is still in a holding pattern. Because The Computer Nerd is fine as it is, I haven’t been in a hurry to “fix” it. The improved version will come eventually, but probably not before I invest in my own ISBNs. I would like to push out the newer story sooner than later, however. Not much has moved on it since 2018, unfortunately.

Shell Out has a new opening chapter, but I don’t think I’ll attach it to the current story that you can find online. I’m pretty sure it will be part of a from-scratch retelling of the current story, told as a novella, or even a novel, with new stakes, premise, and everything. It will likely endure the same treatment that Amusement and The Celebration of Johnny’s Yellow Rubber Ducky are going through, with the same story receiving a much greater expansion into a much greater world. I’m still trying to figure out how to prioritize certain stories for the backlist so that they’ll be better prepared for my front list series releases.

The Fallen Footwear is probably the next story to receive an emergency update. Because the current e-book is a major update to the original short story that I wrote in college, and because I wrote that update during my ultra-prolific release period of May 2015 to May 2016, which meant I released it before really taking the time to decide if it was actually ready for release, including skipping the time I needed to set it aside and read it later to see if I even liked it, I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s my worst public story, and I need to redo it (though I still really like Chapter 1—it’s that dang rest of the story I can’t stand at the moment). So, that’ll happen soon. I’ve actually begun the update already, but I hated so much of what I’ve read that I had to stop and take a break from it. That was about two months ago. It’s another reason why I won’t be doing any more release blitzes in the future. I can give better first impressions.

The Audiovisual Book Experience:

In other news, last month I recorded myself reading Amusement off of Scrivener and uploaded the video series to YouTube. As of now, each episode has views in the low single digits. Basically, it wasn’t a successful experiment, so I probably won’t do another for a while, but I might if more people discover it. If you’re reading this blog, you can jumpstart the Audiovisual Book Experience series by checking out the videos. The playlist for Amusement contains nine videos, including one overview and one introduction that includes legal information (which I read in a funny voice because legal information is lame otherwise).

If you want to see more of these, please leave me comments and feedback, and maybe vote for the story you’d like to see me read in public next.

Writing a Scene in yWriter6:

As of this writing, my YouTube video “Writing a Scene in yWriter6 (yWriter vs Scrivener Part 7)” has 164 views, the third highest in the series, in spite of it being over an hour long. Its total retention rate is at 6.3%, which is pretty amazing given the type of video it is. One commenter liked it so much that he wanted to see more. I don’t know if he’s ever come back to my channel to see if I actually did make more “Writing a Scene in yWriter6” videos, but he did get me thinking that it’s a good series worth continuing, so I’m probably going to make more of them in the near future. So, if you like the video and want to see more of that series, let me know in the comments either here or on the video’s page. It would also be useful to let me know if you want to see the outlining process included or just the scene writing.

Either way, the scene series will continue with Pop Goes the Waterbed.

Conclusion:

So, that’s what’s going on in writer’s world at the moment. Keep checking this blog for new updates about the stories you care about and the life events that you don’t. Leave a comment if you have anything that you want to ask that I can answer and won’t feel shame about later. As always, click the blue button at the bottom of the page to subscribe to this blog.

And while we’re at it, let me know if you’d like these updates split up into multiple releases. Looking at the word count, I can see I’ve given you a lot of information today. Raise your hand if you’ve read this far.

Cover Image: Pixabay

Now Incorporating Draft2Digital and the Books2Read Platform

Remember when I had exciting news last week about my various book updates? Well, now I have even more exciting news to share with you!

And when I say exciting, I mean exciting for book nerds! The rest of you probably won’t care that much.

A few nights ago, I began porting my recently updated e-books to the Draft2Digital platform. For those who don’t know Draft2Digital, it’s a distribution platform like Smashwords, but much nicer looking and reaches a few international markets that Smashwords doesn’t yet reach, specifically !ndigo (Canada), Angus & Robertson (Australia), and Mondadori Store (Italy). Pretty much all of Rakuten Kobo’s international partners. It also connects to subscription services 24 Symbols and Playster, but as of this writing, these platforms have not yet received my books. Soon. Hopefully. Maybe.

I’ve spent a couple of evenings modifying and uploading six of my current e-books to the Draft2Digital platform, and the result is that these e-book versions are the most attractive yet.

Draft2Digital Amusement InteriorDraft2Digital Waterfall Junction Interior

Now, I haven’t yet ported them to the usual retailers (Apple, Barnes & Noble, Kobo) because they’re already opted-in through Smashwords, and to get them connected through Draft2Digital, I’d have to opt them out first, which could mess up their rankings (especially since they’d be listed under a new ISBN). Not sure I want to go through all of that, so for now, this update is limited to the newer storefronts. But I may test the new format with my next release (Snow in Miami).

But, that’s not even the best news. The best news is that my books now use the Books2Read platform to connect readers to all relevant storefronts. That means one link can take you to a hub where all active storefronts are listed.

Check out the link to Eleven Miles from Home for an example.

Books2Read also has a sign-up option for readers to receive notifications every time I submit a new release. It’s a mailing list without all of the fluff! Now you don’t have to miss a single story! (And why would you even want to?) If you haven’t yet used Books2Read, as an author or a reader, you’re missing out. It’s really convenient.

Oh, and if you check out my new Draft2Digital author page, you can also see which books are in the system. See how nice it looks? Yep, it’s a booty! Er, beauty.

It’s also worth noting that I’ve updated the description pages for each of these books right here on Drinking Cafe Latte at 1pm. The description pages now include the abovementioned universal links and relevant descriptive information including genre, literary style, characters, settings, store descriptions, formats, copyrights, book reading stats, prices, media galleries, and links to Wattpad samples and Goodreads reviews. If you’re still not sure whether you want to read these books, hopefully the new description pages will make your decision easier.

The books that currently apply the new format are Amusement, Eleven Miles from Home, The Fountain of Truth, Gutter Child, Waterfall Junction and The Narrow Bridge, and When Cellphones Make Us Crazy. During the month of August (and maybe September), I’ll be working on getting Cards in the Cloak, Shell Out, and The Fallen Footwear up to speed. Subscribe to the Draft2Digital email alerts to find out when they’re live.

And that’s all for now. Hope you like the changes!

You did notice, right?

Cover Image: Pixabay

 

End of July 2019 Update: Book Stuff!

Welcome back.

In today’s episode of Drinking Café Latte at 1pm in the evening, we discuss books. Specifically, we discuss updated books. My updated books. Specifically.

Yes, my books are updated. Not all of them. But some.

Perhaps you’ve read them?

If not, now’s a good time to start. I’ve got free books and cheap books and funny books and happy books and, well, okay, my inventory is limited, so I don’t have much more than that. But what I have is great…if you’re the kind of person who finds books like mine great. Hopefully you are. There is, of course, one way to find out.

Over on the right, you may have seen a long column of strange photos with words on them. Those are book covers. Book covers for my books. Some of them have been updated. Not all of them. But some. Just click on the title(s) you want to find out more about them. Once on the respective book page, you’ll be shown how to download them (or buy them if you’re feeling generous). Again, they’re over there. —>

But, enough sales talk! You didn’t come here for that.

Actually, I don’t know why you’ve come here. But I’m glad you did!

Anyway, here are the updates.

The Updates:

Amusement and Waterfall Junction and The Narrow Bridge have been given the revision and “Readers’ Group Discussion Questions” section treatment. They also have new page descriptions and, in the case of Waterfall Junction and The Narrow Bridge, a new cover.

waterfall junction new base title 3b
Waterfall Junction and The Narrow Bridge cover

I’ve also updated the interior formatting for the above mentioned books, as well as for Eleven Miles from Home, Gutter Child, When Cellphones Make Us Crazy, and The Fountain of Truth. Amazon does the best job showing off the new formatting, for the record.

amusment tablet example.png
Amusement tablet interior

It should also be noted that Eleven Miles from Home and The Fountain of Truth have undergone slight cover modifications, even though neither one has gotten an actual new cover. Eleven Miles from Home in particular is now more genre-appropriate. We’ll see if that increases its downloads at all.

Sales and Price Changes:

For those of you who missed my announcement at the beginning of the month, Cannonball City: A Modern-day Fantasy, Year One, Gutter Child, and When Cellphones Make Us Crazy are available for free on Smashwords until midnight EST, July 31st. On a related note, Superheroes Anonymous: A Modern-day Fantasy, Year Two is 50% off (or $3.99) also until July 31st. Don’t miss out.

I’m also temporarily lowering the prices for Gutter Child and When Cellphones Make Us Crazy to $.99 beginning on August 1st (Cellpones has already been lowered on Amazon), so if you don’t get them at Smashwords during the sale, I’d get them at Amazon as soon as possible. I don’t yet know how long I’ll keep them priced this low, so act soon.

Keywords and Categories:

Two years ago, I purchased a copy of KDP Rocket to help me categorize my books more effectively. I hadn’t really used it much since I was stocking up on resources without doing much with those resources. I’d dabbled with it a little, to see how effective it is at tracking the success potential for keywords. It seemed fine, but it had flaws.

Recently, the program was upgraded to 2.0 and renamed “Publisher Rocket.” With its newest update, it now does a better job tracking all of the various scores and statistics that it was built to track, and its user-interface is much cleaner. In short, I’ve been using it the last couple of weeks to recategorize the abovementioned books. Hopefully, as I continue to tweak and tool the books’ metadata, I’ll be able to figure out how to get each book in front of more readers.

Why should you care about that? Well, 1.) Publisher Rocket is a great program to use for market research if you’re an indie author, and if you’re an indie author, you’ll want to know about it. But also 2.) the more readers I have, the more I’ll stick to writing books and the less I’ll stick to playing video games. That means more books for you. You are reading them, right?

Upcoming Updates:

So, that’s the state of what’s going on right now. Sometime in the next week or two, I’ll also, hopefully, be adding an audio version of Amusement to my YouTube channel, which you can follow along with as I post each chapter right here on Drinking Café Latte at 1pm at the same time!

Lastly, I’ll be working on improved versions of Cards and the Cloak, The Fallen Footwear, and Shell Out as we move into the fall season, and I’ll be including the “Readers’ Group Discussion Questions” for them also. I also, hopefully, will get Snow in Miami finished in the coming weeks. I know I’ve been promising that one for much too long. Have you already forgotten that you’re waiting for it?

New Update: Gutter Child

gutter child cover alt 4
Cover Image for “Gutter Child”

Hello Drinking Cafe Latte at 1pm readers, visitors, lurkers, and boycotters! (I don’t suppose the last group is paying much attention.) I’m sending out a quick announcement that my novella Gutter Child has received a major update this weekend and is now live at most retailers (e-book only). This will be the definitive version of the novella. If the story receives another update (beyond typos or grammatical issues that may surface in spite of my thorough checks for both), it will do so as a novel under a different name and a different A plot. I don’t foresee that happening too soon, so if you want to read the story of a young man trying to solve the mystery of his heritage while attending the worst university in the country and filtering out lies along the way, then give Gutter Child a try today. It currently stands at 40,000 words (about 160 pages) and retails for $2.99. From July 1 – July 31, it will also be available at Smashwords for 50% off the retail price.

If you get your copy, please leave a review at your preferred retailer and/or on Goodreads. You may also comment your feedback here or on the book’s dedicated hub page for additional support.

Thanks and enjoy.

–Jeremy

Note: Updated version contains a mix of new and rewritten scenes, better balanced emotional arcs, improved descriptions, fixes to overlooked typos and errors, and a new section for Readers’ Group Discussion Questions. Changes to story amount to roughly 8000 new words.