The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 31: Discussing “The Emotional Wound Thesaurus” by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi )

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Remember that one time a clown snuck into your room in the middle of the night and tossed a baby crocodile in your bed because he thought it was funny? Do you still have the teeth marks to prove it happened? Sorry to bring up an old memory that’s better left forgotten, but let me ask you, has that one night affected your future to the point that you can’t even go to a circus in the middle of the zoo without breaking down?

If this story sounds familiar, then you’re not alone. (Well, I’m not saying that’s my experience, just that it’s probably someone’s experience.) Everyone has a past that affects the way they think and act today, and your character (as do you) has such a past.

Now, maybe you don’t yet know that past. That’s what backstory is for. But at some point you’ll want to know, and what better time than in the pre-planning phase? This means figuring out a lot of details, like his or her traits (as we discussed last week) and his career (as we will discuss next week), but it also means figuring out what scars him, and that’s what we discuss this week.

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This week, we’re covering The Emotional Wound Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Bella Puglisi, or what you might consider their most requested thesaurus. If you wanted to know why your character can’t go into a public restroom alone, then this book might help you figure out the reason.

Get it at the link below, and be sure to check out my companion video where I discuss it in more detail.

The Emotional Wound Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Psychological Trauma

by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 325 pages

·  ISBN-10: 0989772594

·  ISBN-13: 978-0989772594

·  Publisher: JADD Publishing (October 13, 2017)

Note: This book and other thesauruses by Angela Ackerman and Bella Puglisi contain entries that can also be checked online via their database of definitions at One Stop for Writers. This service not only contains the same entries that you can find within this and other books in the series, but they have additional categories exclusive to the service (like weather and color thesauruses), as well as a character creator that allows you to integrate traits, emotional wounds, etc. directly into character creation. If you’re an industrious writer who likes to know his or her character before writing about him, then check it out.

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 30: Discussing “The Positive and Negative Trait Thesauruses” by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi )

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Whenever you begin a story, you have to start with its first words. And those first words could be “Once upon a time,” or “Gone were the days,” or “Bubba ate shrimp all day long,” or any combination worth a million pages. But then what? Do you actually know your story yet? If you’re an explorer, then you may know it a little or maybe not at all. What about your character(s)? Does that princess live in a castle or a high-rise? Does your aging detective still have a job? Does your buddy character eat anything other than shrimp?

You may not have the answers to everything at the beginning, and maybe you don’t want to. But you’re gonna have to know those characters eventually, and what better way to understand them than to study their potential traits?

Is that aging detective amiable or cranky? Is he industrious or lazy? Resourceful or irresponsible? At some point you’ll need to know, and what better time to find out than right now?

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This week we’re covering not one, but two guides that can help you get to know your characters better before you even write, “These were the best of times, but they were also just the worst.” The Positive Trait Thesaurus and The Negative Trait Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Bella Puglisi are just the books you need for your bookshelf if you want to create believable characters with identifiable attributes that are accurate and conflict-driven.

Check them out at the links below, and check out my companion video where I discuss them in greater detail. Don’t forget to let us know what you think.

The Positive Trait Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Attributes

by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 252 pages

·  ISBN-10: 0989772519

·  ISBN-13: 978-0989772518

·  Publisher: JADD Publishing (October 3, 2013)

The Negative Trait Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Flaws

by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 270 pages

·  ISBN-10: 0989772500

·  ISBN-13: 978-0989772501

·  Publisher: JADD Publishing (September 24, 2013)

Note: These books and other thesauruses by Angela Ackerman and Bella Puglisi contain entries that can also be checked online via their database of definitions at One Stop for Writers. This service not only contains the same entries that you can find within these books, but they have additional categories exclusive to the service (like weather and color thesauruses), as well as a character creator that allows you to integrate traits, emotional wounds, etc. directly into character creation. If you’re an industrious writer who likes to know his or her character before writing about him, then check it out.

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 29: Discussing “The Emotion Thesaurus” by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi )

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Remember that one time your character “narrowed his eyes,” or “shuffled his feet,” or “rolled his eyes” when something demanded him to offer an emotional response? Remember when he did it again? And again? And so on?

Don’t you wish you were astute enough to mention how your character’s response to boredom was not to “tap his fingers against the desk” but to “pick at his bowl of Cheetos because it gives him something to do”?

Then welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf because today you’re in luck. Our focus book this week is The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Bella Puglisi (even though the example I gave you is actually from their companion e-book, Emotion Amplifiers). Its purpose is to help you create moments in fiction that express character emotion rather than talk about it, giving you a wide berth for creating compelling action. It also helps you to figure out what types of characters you have when you explore the many options they may have for responding to stimuli, all the while helping you to break the habit of relying on the same three expressions over and over and over. It’s pretty revolutionary.

Check out my video discussing it for more information.

Or save yourself a half an hour and just buy the book now because you’re gonna want this one. Details below.

Note: This article refers to the book’s Second Edition (with 130 definitions as opposed to the original 75).

The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression

by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 302 pages

·  ISBN-10: 0999296345

·  ISBN-13: 978-0999296349

·  Publisher: JADD Publishing; 2nd ed. edition (February 14, 2019)

If you also want to get the companion e-book, here’s that information:

Emotion Amplifiers

by Angela Ackerman & Bella Puglisi

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Print length : 65 pages

·  ASIN : B00QMLW34M

·  Publisher : JADD Publishing (December 4, 2014)

Additional Note: Buying direct from their website gives you access to a PDF version if you’d rather keep the formatting intact.

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 28: Discussing “Writer’s Guide to Character Traits” by Linda N. Edelstein, Ph.D. )

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Writing fiction and memoir is hard, and writing compelling characters is much of what makes it hard. We often dive into a manuscript or outline with a basic understanding of what makes our characters tick, but often that understanding turns out even shallower than what we’d previously thought. This can lead not only to frustration but a belief that the manuscript will never live up to its potential. After all, if we can’t understand our characters well, or what makes them believable, then how can we trust our false effort to pass them off to our readers as believable?

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. This week’s book, Writer’s Guide to Character Traits, Second Edition by Linda N. Edelstein, Ph.D., helps us through this issue by providing us with a bank of character traits for any and most occasions, using psychological profiles for certain character types and breaking down the many traits that accompany that profile. And you know it’s useful because the titled credential in the author’s name proves that she knows what she’s talking about.

This book is a mix of narrative and definitions, text and charts. It’s also quite long, but very resourceful for anyone who takes their character development seriously. It even, on occasion, gives tips on how the writer can handle moments of crisis or change. It’s definitely an essential reference for anyone who wants a believable and empathetic character.

Check out my video on the topic to find out more about it.

Writer’s Guide to Character Traits, Second Edition

by Linda N. Edelstein, Ph.D.

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 384 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1582973903

·  ISBN-13: 978-1582973906

·  Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books; Second edition (August 9, 2006)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.