The Writer’s Bookshelf: Recommended References and Writing Resources (Episode 21: Discussing “The War of Art” by Steven Pressfield)

Title Image for The Writer’s Bookshelf Episode 21

Welcome back to The Writer’s Bookshelf. It’s time for a new season of goodness with a new crop of even more written goodness. In this case, I’m referring to written goodness of the referential kind, and by referential goodness, I mean good things you can refer to if you want to improve your writing skills. And by improve your writing skills, what I really mean is…

Okay, after twenty episodes, you know how this works.

This season, we’ll be focusing primarily on the craft of writing. This means we’ll cover topics like characterization, settings, conflicts, and more.

But not today!

No, today’s book is basically a cult book for writers. It’s a book about productivity in a time when none of us wants to commit to our art. True, we all say that we want to create art (like writing novels, for example). And we might even believe it! But most of us say that as we slay a dragon on that videogame we’re playing or as we post yet another article on Facebook, trying to prove once and for all that we’re right about whatever it is we think we’re right about. Today’s book attempts to slay that dragon, the one called “resistance,” the thing that stops us from actually writing.

The War of Art by Steven Pressfield gets to the heart of our resistance against creating art (even when we say we’re artists!) and spurs us on to get back to work. It’s like a 12-step for writers in written form. Or maybe a cult. You decide.

For more information, check out this week’s latest video.

The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles

by Steven Pressfield

Website

Amazon Metadata:

·  Paperback: 190 pages

·  ISBN-10: 1936891026

·  ISBN-13: 978-1936891023

·  Publisher: Black Irish Entertainment LLC; 47716th edition (January 11, 2012)

Check out other entries in the Writer’s Bookshelf series here.

Don’t forget to like, subscribe, comment, and do all of the things that convince me you like this kind of information and want more like it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s