The Marketing Author 001

Missed an article from this series? Look for it here.

“Introduction”

We all aspire to become excellent at what we do, and what we do, we hope, is somehow tied into our hopes and dreams. People who aspire to build the greatest architecture in the world hope that their names will be synonymous with structures equaling the likes of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, or Freedom Tower in New York, or that skyscraper in Dubai that Tom Cruise risked his life scaling for a scene in Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, the Burj Khalifa. But to reach that level, these dreaming architects must prepare themselves for greatness, and while many may want to just skip to the awesome, becoming awesome generally takes a few baby steps and a lot of planning.

As an author who aspires to become well-sustained on passive income from my novels, especially from my A Modern-day Fantasy series, which I’m still working on and will be for a while still, I can relate to this thinking, to this become-awesome-today-and-worry-about-the-details-getting-there-tomorrow idea of success. And thanks to my hubris at having great titles to share and ignorance at having a great marketing plan to get the word out, my journey out the gate has been a rocky reflection of this poor excuse for an ideology.

Fortunately, I’ve spent countless hours—amounting to weeks most likely (there’s 168 hours in a week, so, you know, math)—studying how to market, how to give my books the best foot forward and so on, and the one thing I’ve learned consistently in this journey is that everyone has an opinion about what works, what doesn’t, and that all of them say pretty much inconsistent things to the tune of a similar drumbeat.

Granted, I like these inconsistent things because it convinces me that any strategy could work, as long as it isn’t destructive in nature. Coming up with my own brilliant ideas could also be a strategy, if I had brilliant ideas to come up with. And sometimes I think I do have brilliant ideas.

But, I often cut my ideas short when I think about the cost involved or the legislation I have to deal with to ensure appropriate business. Then I tend to bury my ideas when I realize the planning involved is extensive and the dedication to consistent marketing is unrelenting. And, of course, the worst part of all marketing, the thing that puts to the death all of my good intentions, is the money needed to make it all happen. I usually don’t have anything left over after my bills are all paid each month. How am I supposed to do much with nothing?

The gurus I listen to all want to give free advice up to a point. But then they want money for their truest lessons. That, too, is a sound business model. For them. For me, as someone who’s trying to learn on the tightest of budgets, it’s a terrible business model, as the high cost of learning anything valuable makes it a challenge getting the information I need to succeed. I can generally learn something from these people’s free advice, but probably not enough. And they know that. That’s why they write books, sell premium courses, and save their best stuff for the paying customer. It’s an education, dangit!

Yet, these people know what they’re talking about. They’re marketers, and good ones at that. Their strategies, though sometimes conflicting with other strategies, work, so I’m shown in their promotional videos. I, and any writer (or inventor, game designer, etc.) who aspires for success, should listen to any and all of them and sort out the elements that work best.

But the money….

This is when I realized that for every Author 101, Author Marketing 101, Author Business 101, and so on that’s out there, there is a need for a prerequisite course to prepare us for the education and marketing ahead, a 001 if you will.

I don’t know of any that are out there, so I figure it’s time to start one if none exists (or is so obscure that no one has bothered to sell me on it in some lengthy email campaign). So, that’s what The Marketing Author 001 will aspire to do: To help pave a smooth road ahead of the drive that aspiring authors (and anyone else with a great idea) plan to take on their journeys toward greatness.

I won’t charge for this. I don’t expect there to be any video involved (I’m on a tight budget, remember?). I don’t know that it will even go beyond the first post—there may be no need for anything past my initial thoughts. I just want to share what’s on my mind regarding my rocky journey out the self-publishing gate and hopefully help aspiring anybodies to adequately prepare for the 101 instructions that flood the Internet and the marketing measures necessary to drive success.

As per my Why It’s Okay to Write for Fun series, I don’t know how many installments I’ll have for The Marketing Author 001 as of this introductory article, but I will have at least one starting on Wednesday, March 1, 2017, at 1pm EST. If more follow, I’ll update this post with links and estimated times of arrival, so bookmark this page and check back often. Or check the tabs at the top of Drinking Café Latte at 1pm for an upcoming section for “Blog Series Posts,” where I’ll give easy access to any series I’ve written. (I haven’t set that section up yet, but I’ll revise this post once I do.)

Until then, remember this piece of advice: Preparation is more important than release. If you pull the trigger before setting up the target, you’ll hit the wrong thing, or hit nothing at all.

Check back here soon for Part 1 and the roster of potential future posts.

Oh, and please subscribe to my blog to receive updates. I always forget to suggest that. There’s your first free lesson: Remind your readers or customers to take action that’ll keep you relevant. The button to subscribe can be found at the bottom of this page. Just as I promised, that advice is free.

Update (3/1/17):

Just a quick programming note and content update: I’m going to experiment with a release schedule for later in the evenings, between 7 – 9pm, instead of early afternoons. I’m still trying to find the best time for connectivity with readers. The release schedule may seem screwy at first, but that’s because I want to maximize visibility, and that might require experimentation. I know; it’s the Internet, and an article release schedule shouldn’t matter, but if no one’s reading, then something’s wrong, and I want to fix it. (And I know it has nothing to do with the quality of the articles because this is golden information, people!) Also, I have a brief outline for The Marketing Author 001 series. As of now, I’ve got plans for 11 articles. Make sure you stick around and read them all. I’m sure they’ll open your eyes to things unseen.

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Why It’s Okay to Write for Fun (Part 8): The Importance of Finding Useful Education and Resources

Missed Part 7? Read it here:

“The Importance of Finding Useful Education and Resources”

Writing should be fun. But it becomes more fun when we know how to do it.

Okay, so how do we write? Or better yet, how do we teach ourselves to write? I’ve spent seven parts building up this idea that we can become mavericks, writing whatever the heck we want, however we want, but that’s not really my goal here. My goal is to take away the stress of writing that professionalism often puts on those of us who want to succeed as an author. This, in no way, means that we should go into the game without the right education, or even without professionalism as a goal.

In “The Importance of Knowing the Rules of Writing and Storytelling,” I gave you a list of eleven tips to get you started, but the tips are purposely vague so that you have an understanding of what to look for in your path toward writing improvement, so that you actually go out and do the research to better yourself.

When we talk about research, we tend to limit it to items we wish to use in our books, but we often forget that learning how to write requires just as much research as learning what to write. Likewise, research is important for instructing us how to get our message out into the marketplace, should we decide to take that path.

As I said in “The Importance of Learning from Our Past,” college alone won’t teach us everything we need to know about writing, marketing, or any of the things we actually care about when we decide we want to be authors. It’ll teach us a few useful fundamentals, like how to write dialogue effectively, and it’ll do it as quickly and vaguely as possible, but even then we need to be careful, as the exercises we’re often given as warm-ups can lull us into a pattern of self-destructive story ideas, where simple actions like searching for the perfect jelly in which to put on a sandwich, can feel like a good idea at the time we write them, when in reality those scenes, if used in a real story, would probably waste a serious reader’s time, and if that happens, then why did we write that practice scene in the first place?

To get the full education we deserve, we need to look for outside sources, written or taught by experts in their respective fields. And I don’t mean experts on how to write a sex scene. Even though that’s helpful, we don’t need to start there. What we need is to start with the people who understand what drives a story, then work our way into learning from those microscopic masters who have so much knowledge of the steamy love scene that they can fill an entire book about it.

Of course, my message here is to read more. I did not improve by watching hours upon hours of reality television (though, I contend that watching reality television isn’t a complete waste of time, as they are edited to give viewers the maximum amount of conflict in an otherwise lukewarm scenario, so you can still learn the importance of storytelling from them, even from shows like Keeping Up with the Kardashians, I’m guessing). I improved through practice and reading the types of stories I enjoy. I also improved my skills from reading books I’ve found in the Reference section at Barnes & Noble or the virtual shelves at the Writer’s Digest shop.

As an author exploring the indie market, I’ve also studied from newly minted experts in their respective fields, like cover design, editing, copywriting, and so on, to better understand my place in this saturated market, and what I need to do to stand out. More and more this journey teaches me that it’s not always about writing for fun. But the more I learn, the more I realize that knowing nothing is merely ignorant, and there’s nothing fun about realizing either through education or a bad review that everything I’ve written up to a certain point has been crap riddled with more crap. At some point, I need to acknowledge that learning from experts (not just teachers at a high school or college) is just as important as reading the masters or tapping into my imagination.

This means that I need to study my craft, whether I go to college or not. This means I need to study, whether I’ve finished college or not.

There’s no end to the ways we can improve ourselves. I still stand by my message in “The Importance of Imperfection” that we should never wait until things are perfect to share our works with our intended audiences. But we still need to make sure we’ve done all that we can to properly educate ourselves with the expectations that readers will have of our works. This includes understanding the conventions of the genres we’re writing in, understanding what readers are buying our books for in the first place, and so on. To get there, we need to chart an educational path for ourselves. We need to start by reading those instructional manuals that the pioneers before us have written in order to prevent us from making the same mistakes they made when they first started. We need to start by putting into practice the sound advice that the experts give us.

If we write irresponsibly, then we may find that the fun in writing will eventually run out, as writing, while cathartic, is at its best shared, and we want to share what we know is good. Right? Writing well without doing the work to ensure great writing is hard to do. Our intuitions, our laziness, and our justifications for each will take us only so far.

Now, I cannot tell you how to chart your path. I do hope to begin a resource education series in the near future to make figuring out that path a little easier, but I still need some time to prepare that, as it will require a lot of reading and remembering. But, here’s a quick list of books I recommend you look into while you’re forgetting everything you learned in school or in this series:

On Writing by Stephen King

Story Engineering, Story Physics, and Story Fix by Larry Brooks

Hooked by Les Edgerton

The Story Grid by Shawn Coyne

Note that these books are great for foundations, but may not give you all that you need for settings, characters, dialogue, etc. But again, part of becoming a better writer is to do the research, and if you take my advice, you’ll find your way down the right path. Personally, I like reading newly released books to see these authors’ takes on a subject I’ve already learned, as every writing instructor will have his or her unique way of getting a message across, and inevitably somebody will teach me something new. So, even if you think you’ve learned everything you need to know, I can assure you that you haven’t. That said, you can still certainly learn enough from just the five books I’ve highlighted above to get you on the right track.

So, I hope you’ve gotten a lot out of this series, especially if you’ve thought about writing but weren’t sure you could do it. You can, but make sure you don’t do it blindly, and don’t expect to be great at it immediately. Like any skill, it takes a long time to get good at it. But I guarantee that your favorite author wasn’t always good at it, so don’t let the thought of learning stop you from starting or doing. Just forward-think a little before you start sharing.

Keep following Drinking Café Latte at 1pm for more articles on writing, storytelling, resources, and so on. You can also check out some of the stories I’ve written to get an idea how my journey has panned out. Many of them are available to read in their entirety via the “My Books” dropdown in the header above. My favorite is “Shell Out,” if you want to start there. It’s a short story in seven parts. Also, if you want to stay centered on your writing journey, I’d highly recommend you familiarize yourself with Writer’s Digest and visit its online bookstore. I believe it publishes 16 books on writing a year, and each book is tailor-targeted to a specific element in writing, including structure, characters, scene-setting, and even nonfiction.

Leave comments if you have any questions.

Why It’s Okay to Write for Fun (Part 7): The Importance of Knowing the Rules of Writing and Storytelling

Missed Part 6? Read it here:

“The Importance of Knowing the Rules of Writing and Storytelling”

Okay, so we’ve spent six parts talking about writing in general terms, about keeping it fun but not reckless, accessible but not a smorgasbord of ideas. Sure, that’s great, but how do we synthesize it all into the elements needed to craft a proper story?

Throughout the years I’ve been studying how to write well, I’ve learned plenty of essential rules for maintaining reader interest. Some of these rules include:

  1. Don’t overwrite. Set the scene as quickly as you can so you can get right to the action. Nobody cares how many props are sitting on the counter beside your hero. Readers want you to get to the point.
  2. Don’t over explain. Trust your reader’s intuition. Just because the world is full of people who need their hands held for everything doesn’t mean your readers are among that population. They’re readers, after all. Not mouth breathers. They’re inherently seekers of knowledge and wisdom, and admire any writer who trusts them to think for themselves.
  3. Show, don’t tell. Fiction in particular is a medium for the imagination, but nobody wants to imagine so much that they inevitably tell the story themselves. They still want the writer’s viewpoint and voice to shine through. Leaving out too many actions in order to explain concepts or history lessons puts more work on the reader’s mind than he or she deserves, and a good story, while allowing room for some imagination, will ultimately lead the reader down a path of understanding that is uniquely funneled through the vision of the writer.
  4. Make sure somebody changes. Usually you want the hero to go through a change, or character arc, as I’ve mentioned above, before the story ends, but even if the change is delegated to others on the actions of the hero, then that seems to work, too. Writing a story where nothing changes means writing a story that isn’t worth telling, or reading.
  5. Make sure it has a satisfying ending. This is a complicated piece that deserves its own blog, chapter, or entire book to flesh out, but the basic premise is ingrained in our cores. We want the ending to make sense and leave a satisfying finish to the gripping tale we’ve just spent eight hours or so reading. To give readers anything less, including a cliffhanger that does more to frustrate readers than to entice them to read the next installment, or an ending where a character, who should’ve died based on the events of the story, lives because it would be “too sad” otherwise, is damaging to us and our readership, and should be avoided.
  6. Write a story that people want to read, or for nonfiction writers, a topic that people care about. This means understanding what makes a story worth telling. This means addressing complications and developing a path that leads to a solution. In a way, this applies to both fiction and nonfiction. But that also means that the problem should in fact be a problem. Trying to save a marriage in spite of one partner cheating is a problem laced with a difficult solution and no clear answer to success, and thus a topic or story worth exploring. Trying to make breakfast when the toaster is on the fritz is less of a crisis and doesn’t demand a whole book to solve. (Pro tip: Use the stove or the microwave to make breakfast, or go to McDonald’s. No book needed. That advice is free.)
  7. Obey your own rules. If you establish natural rules or laws in your story, make sure your characters follow those laws. If you bend natural rules early on to establish a new paradigm for your characters, make sure everything involved in your story stays true to that. The moment you violate your own rules, you create anarchy within your story, and the reader will be quick to check out, as he or she would rather live in a world that adheres to order. Plus, you know, suspension of disbelief has limits….
  8. Keep it accessible. Writers like David Mamet and Cameron Crowe can get away with a certain writing style as it translates to their characters because that’s what audiences pay to listen to or read. Readers and audiences know that their characters will speak a higher English than average to capture the poetry of the situation, almost like a modern-day Shakespeare. But it takes a certain talent, and reason, to pull this off well. Most readers, however, prefer more accessible characters with more accessible speaking styles than these high art characters, and to write them unnaturally can complicate the reader’s reception of them.
  9. Be consistent. Going along with obeying your own rules, you want to also obey your style. Nothing spells eyesore worse than moving from elevated language to lowbrow and back, or switching between omniscient and first person points of view, or even swapping verb tense.
  10. Be grammatically correct. This also follows along with consistency, in that readers want professionalism to show up in anything they read. As soon as they see a sentence that has no ending, or a word that’s misused, or a proper noun that isn’t capitalized, they feel cheated, and no writer should want to cheat his reader.
  11. Always revise until there’s nothing left to fix. This one’s a trick, as there will always be something left to fix. Always. But, you can adjust the story and fix the mistakes until it resembles a competent work. Then you can decide if you want to keep fixing it. However, the key here is that revisions are necessary, no matter which stage of writing the draft is in, and the earlier you are in the process, the more time you’ll need to put into fixing it.

And so on. This list is pretty standard in writing, and anyone who’s spent enough time writing anything will confirm how important these points are to follow. But this list should be merely a launching point for anyone who wants to study the craft of writing (whether for fun or for business), and not the final word, as there will always be experts who have more words to add and more wisdom to dispense than what you will find in any one place.

For example, I’ve taken a number of classes on how to write, but none of them really focused on the business of writing, and none of them had the time to devote to the structure of writing. Most, if not all, focused on the microscopic elements of writing—characters, settings, etc.—and not on foundations like the three-act structure, plot points, opening hooks, and so on. None of them spent time examining genre works, or the conventions of those genres. And, as I’ve studied my craft independently in my post-collegiate years, I’ve learned more and more about the storytelling necessities that I didn’t learn earning my degree, and, more importantly, how important it is to keep studying my craft no matter how much I think I already know. There’s always something new to learn, even if my early history shows that I already knew a lot intuitively.

So, my challenge to aspiring writers is to write for fun, but learn to write for fun within the confines of the rules required for your particular type of work. I don’t spend much time writing nonfiction, but my advice still stands. Learn what readers of nonfiction want before you start writing for that audience you’ve never met but want to teach. Writers of fiction should take as much time as possible learning the rules of fiction before tossing anything and everything they write out to an audience that may not like the type of worm they’re putting on the hook.

Writing doesn’t have to become the leading cause of baldness or drunkenness in our society. We can still leave those things to genetics. We just have to know why we’re doing it, who we’re doing it for, and understand that sometimes writing isn’t fun, but it still needs to get done, because if we care a lick about sharing our perspectives of the world to other people who may or may not empathize with us, then the only way we’re gonna do that is to sit down and do it, whether we think it’s fun or not.

Next Week: “The Importance of Finding Useful Education and Resources”